MN Hospitality Advocate

Minneapolis City Council Deals with Fire Inspection Issues

Posted in City Council, Restaurant Issues, Uncategorized by hospitalityminnesota on May 24, 2010

I just returned from a meeting at Minneapolis City Hall in which the city’s Fire Department was grilled about inspection procedures and in which a new system sharing the inspection duty with the Department of Regulatory Services is the recommended model. I was at the hearing because about six months ago, the City of Minneapolis Fire Department instituted a new hood cleaning permit fee. The fee, a minimum of $130 each time a hood is cleaned, is charged to the hood cleaning company, which then passes along the fee to the restaurant operator.

The issue, as raised by the Fire Department, is that some of the cleaning companies aren’t doing an adequate job. The inspection fee was established to require the cleaning companies to take digital pictures of each cleaning job and provide those in order for the permit to be validated. We understand the issue. Our problem is that restaurants are now facing a minimum $130 cleaning permit fee in Minneapolis each time they have a hood cleaned. This amounts to a disincentive to hood cleaning.

Our approach would suggest a different strategy – have the fire department conduct periodic inspections of work done by the cleaning companies (they license them and know who they are, after all). Eliminate the $130 per cleaning fee and instead, charge a penalty of the cleaning company if the work completed is inadequate.

We have been working behind the scenes with various Minneapolis City Council members to try and achieve these changes, or at least, gain a reconsideration of the current ordinance. But in the midst of this effort, Heidi’s Restaurant in Minneapolis went up in flames due to what is reported as a hood fire, and in another tragic incident, members of a family were killed when the apartment in which they were staying went up in flames, also destroying a bar below. These two incidents have cast huge attention on the work of the Fire Department and getting changes to our hood cleaning permit fees, which are a projected $200,000 or more revenue generator for the department, is proving difficult.

Nonetheless, we continue to work the system. It appears there will be a more comprehensive review of the city’s fire codes in 2011. That might provide an opportunity for change. But we can’t wait that long. The hood cleaning permit fee is slated for review after one year of implementation, and we’ll be on hand seeking to eliminate (or at a minimum reduce) the fees.

We express our appreciation with the Minneapolis Area Chamber of Commerce for working with us on this important issue. If you have a relationship with any Minneapolis council members, now is the time to talk to them about this onerous fee and its impact on your business.

David Siegel, CAE, IOM
Minnesota Restaurant, Lodging and Resort & Campground Associations and Hospitality Minnesota

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